2015-2016

Session 42: “The Persistence of the Word Victorian in America”

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Session 42 of our seminar took place on Wednesday 22 June 2016 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 (Bâtiment Olympes de Gouges, salle 347, 17h30-19h30).

Three Americanists from the A19 research group (LARCA, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7) talked about the persistence of the word Victorian in America.

VP Victorian America

Michel Imbert, Cécile Roudeau and Thomas Constantinesco thinking about Victorian America

 

Thomas Constantinesco gave a paper entitled “Victorian America: American Literary Studies and the Transatlantic Turn”.

Michel Imbert will gave entitled “A Tale of Two Cities: Transatlantic Twice-told Tales”, which will focus on Dickens’s American Notes, Melville’s “The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids” and Poe’s “The Man of the Crowd”.

Cécile Roudeau responded to both papers.

We worked with extracts from the following texts:

– Charles Dickens, American Notes (1842)

– Henry James, “The Jolly Corner” (1908)

– Henry James, “Maud-Evelyn” (1900)

– Melville’s “The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids

– Edgar Allan Poe, “The Man of the Crowd“(1850)

– Paul Giles, “Virtual Subjects: Transnational Fictions and the Transatlantic Imaginary”, in Virtual Americas: Transnational Fictions and the Transatlantic Imaginary, Durham, Duke UP, 2002, 1-21

– Jared Hickman, “On the Redundancy of ‘Transnational American Studies’”, in The Oxford Handbook of Ninetenth-Century American Literature, Russ Castronovo ed., New York, Oxford UP, 2012, 269-288.

 

 

American home

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Session 41: “Inhabiting Victorian Sexual Ideology in Eyes Wide Shut and Antichrist

Session 41 of our seminar took place on Thursday 19 May 2016 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 (Bâtiment Olympes de Gouges, salle 347, 18h-20h).

VP41

Aina Marti (King’s College London) gave a paper entitled ‘Inhabiting Victorian Sexual Ideology in Eyes Wide Shut and Antichrist‘. Her respondent was Clémence Folléa (Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7).

photo 3photo 1

We worked with extracts from the following texts and films:

Bachelard, Gaston. Chapter 1, section V in La Poétique de l’espace (1954) pp. 44-56.

– Eco, Umberto. “Function and Sign: Semiotics of Architecture”, (1997) pp. 173-181.

– Garber, Marjorie.  Sex and Real Estate: Why We Love Houses. New York: Phanteon Books, 2000. pp. 58-66, pp. 71-89. Garber, Marjorie, Sex and real estate

– Stanley Kubrick, Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

– Lars von Trier, Antichrist (2009)

 

Session 40: “Women’s Transatlantic Poetic Network”

Session 40 of our seminar took place on Wednesday 10 January 2016 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7.

Corinne

François Gégard, Corinne at Cape Miseno, oil on canvas, 1819.

Páraic Finnerty (University of Portsmouth) gave a paper entitled “Women’s Transatlantic Poetic Network.” His respondent was Adeline Chevrier-Bosseau (Université Paris-Est Créteil).

IMG_6170

Páraic Finnerty and Adeline Chevrier-Bosseau talking about Emily Dickinson

Páraic worked with extracts from the following texts:

– Chapman, Alison, ‘Poetry, Network, Nation: Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Expatriate Women’s Poetry’ in Networking the Nation: British and American Womens Poetry and Italy, 1840-1870 (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2003), 55–77. Chapman, Poetry, Network, Nation

– Peterson, ‘Victorian Poets, Politics and Networks’, Victorian Studies, Winter, 2013, Vol. 55 Issue 2, 309–317. Peterson, Victorian Poets, Politics and Networks

– Quotes from various literary works which can be found here: Women’s Transatlantic Poetic Network, quotes

Adeline analyzed some of Emily Dickinson’s poems:

XXVI
THE BRAIN within its groove
Runs evenly and true;
But let a splinter swerve,
’T were easier for you
To put the water back 5
When floods have slit the hills,
And scooped a turnpike for themselves,
And blotted out the mills!
CVI
I FELT a cleavage in my mind
As if my brain had split;
I tried to match it, seam by seam,
But could not make them fit.
The thought behind I strove to join
Unto the thought before,
But sequence ravelled out of reach
Like balls upon a floor.
XLI
SPLIT the lark and you ’ll find the music,
Bulb after bulb, in silver rolled,
Scantily dealt to the summer morning,
Saved for your ear when lutes be old.
Loose the flood, you shall find it patent,
Gush after gush, reserved for you;
Scarlet experiment! sceptic Thomas,
Now, do you doubt that your bird was true?

Session 39: “‘But little is known of that curious and very interesting animal’: Persisting intertextuality and May Sinclair’s place (or lack of it) in literary history”

Session 39 of our seminar took place on Wednesday 4 November 2015 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 (Bâtiment Olympes de Gouges, salle 346, 17h30-19h30).

May Sinclair, White Dress

May Sinclair, White Dress

Leslie De Bont (Université de Nantes) gave a paper entitled “‘But little is known of that curious and very interesting animal’: Persisting intertextuality and May Sinclair’s place (or lack of it) in literary history”. Her respondent was Dr Leigh Wilson (University of Westminster)

We worked with extracts from the following texts:

– Suzanne Raitt, May Sinclair: A Modern Victorian (2000)

– Michel de Certau, Heterologies: Discourses on the Other(1986) ModernVictorian_Heterologies

– May Sinclair, Mary Olivier: A Life (1919) MaryOlivier

– May Sinclair, A Defence of Idealism: Some Questions and Conclusions (1917) DefenceofIdealism

Session 38: “From Life: Julia Margaret Cameron, sympathetic Shakespeare and photographic afterlives.”

Session 38 of our seminar took place on Wednesday 7 October 2015 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 (Bâtiment Olympes de Gouges, salle 347, 17h30-19h30).

Sarah Barnden (King’s College London) gave a paper entitled “From Life: Julia Margaret Cameron, sympathetic Shakespeare and photographic afterlives.” Her respondent was Pr. Ladan Niayesh (Université Paris Diderot).

1. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1865, Prospero and Miranda, albumen print. Models: Henry Taylor and Mary Ryan. 2. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1872, King Lear allotting his kingdom to his three daughters, albumen print. Models: Lorina Liddell, Edith Liddell, Charles Hay Cameron, Alice Pleasance Liddell.

1. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1865, Prospero and Miranda, albumen print. Models: Henry Taylor and Mary Ryan.
2. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1872, King Lear allotting his kingdom to his three daughters, albumen print. Models: Lorina Liddell, Edith Liddell, Charles Hay Cameron, Alice Pleasance Liddell.

1. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1867, Romeo and Juliet, albumen print. Models: Henry John Stedman Cotton and Mary Ryan. 2. Lewis Carroll (Charles Dodgson), c.1859, Alice Liddell as the Beggar Maid, albumen print. Model: Alice Pleasance Liddell.

1. Julia Margaret Cameron, 1867, Romeo and Juliet, albumen print. Models: Henry John Stedman Cotton and Mary Ryan.
2. Lewis Carroll (Charles Dodgson), c.1859, Alice Liddell as the Beggar Maid, albumen print. Model: Alice Pleasance Liddell.

We worked with sections from the following texts:

  • Julia Margaret Cameron, Annals of my Glass House, 1874, first published in Photo Beacon 2 (1890), pp.157-60. Cameron
  • Peter Holland, ‘Haunting Shakespeare, or King Lear meets Alice’ pp.197-216 in Theatre and Ghosts: Materiality, Performance and Modernity ed. Mary Luckhurst and Emilie Morin, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) Holland
  • William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1606. KING LEAR

Session 37: “Cold Feet, Ruined Gold : Decomposing bodies in A.C. Swinburne’s poetry”

Session 37 of our seminar took place on Wednesday 23 September 2015 at the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 (Bâtiment Olympes de Gouges, salle 347, 17h30-19h30).

Angelo Giorgi and David Manetti, Reliquary of the Head of Saint Catherine, The Basilica of San Domenico, Siena.

Angelo Giorgi and David Manetti, Reliquary of the Head of Saint Catherine, The Basilica of San Domenico, Siena.

Andria Pancrazi (Université Paris Diderot) gave a paper entitled “Cold Feet, Ruined Gold : Decomposing bodies in A.C. Swinburne’s poetry.” His respondent will be Sébastien Scarpa (Université Stendhal-Grenoble 3).

We worked with sections from the following texts:

  • Algernon Charles Swinburne, “The Leper”, from Poems and Ballads, 1866. The Leper
  • Yopie Prins, “Swinburne’s Sapphic Sublime” in Victorian Sappho (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999), 114-5. Victorian Sappho
  • Wolfdietrich Rasch, “Literary Decadence. Artistic Representations of Decay”, Journal of Contemporary History, Vol.17, No.1, Decadence (Jan. 1982), pp. 201-18. Rasch
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