SHOWS OF LONDON: SPRING 2015 Monday 26th January ‘Music and Mobility’

SHOWS OF LONDON: SPRING 2015

Monday 26th January

‘Music and Mobility’

Curated by  Dr Jonathan Hicks, King’s College London

A-photograph-of-Vauxhall--1859

6:15-8:00pm
Room 6.01
Virginia Woolf Building
22 Kingsway.

Music was very much on the move in nineteenth-century London. Yet there is little scholarly literature directly addressing musical mobility in the Romantic and Victorian periods. The aim of this session is to consider how existing work on the historical mobilities of culture (Greenblatt), objects (Plotz), and fiction (Rigney) might have a bearing on musicological enquiry. At the same time we will ask how the history of nineteenth-century music making might contribute to more general debates about mobile experience, both within the humanities and in the related discipline of geography (Cresswell and Merriman). In order to bring these debates into focus, we will consider how some aspects of nineteenth-century London’s musical life – street singing, pleasure garden performance, and promenade concerts – might benefit from being studied under a rubric of mobility.

Stephen Greenblatt, “Cultural mobility: an introduction” and “A mobility studies manifesto,” Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto, edited by Stephen Greenblatt, pp. 1-23 and 250-253 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009)

John Plotz, “The Global, the Local, and the Portable” and “Is Portability Portable?” in Portable Property: Victorian Culture on the Move, pp. 1-23 and 170-182 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008)

Ann Rigney, “Procreativity: Remediation and Rob Roy,” in The Afterlives of Walter Scott: Memory on the Move, pp. 49-77 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012)

Tim Cresswell and Peter Merriman, “Introduction” to Geographies of Mobilities – Practices, Spaces, Subjects, pp. 1-18 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2011)

Wine and snacks will be served. Please contact nicola.kirkby@kcl.ac.uk with any inquiries.​

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